Science of Addiction

Science of Addiction

How does my brain work?

brain 222

The brain is made up of many parts that all work together as a team. Different parts of the brain are responsible for coordinating and performing specific functions.

The brain is a communications center consisting of billions of neurons, or nerve cells. Networks of neurons pass messages back and forth among different structures within the brain, the spinal cord, and nerves in the rest of the body (the peripheral nervous system). These nerve networks coordinate and regulate everything we feel, think, and do.

How does a brain cell work?

Illustration showing the Human Neuron Anatomy

Neuron to Neuron

Each nerve cell (neuron)  in the brain sends and receives messages in the form of electrical and chemical signals. Once a cell receives and processes a message, it sends it on to other neurons.

Neurotransmitters – The Brain’s Chemical Messengers

The messages are typically carried between neurons by chemicals called neurotransmitters.

cocrrenneuron Receptors – The Brain’s Chemical Receivers

The neurotransmitter attaches to a specialized site on the receiving neuron called a  receptor.   A neurotransmitter and its receptor operate like a “key and lock,” an exquisitely  specific mechanism that ensures that each receptor will forward the appropriate message only after interacting with the right kind of neurotransmitter.

 Transporters – The Brain’s Chemical Recyclers

Located on the neuron that releases the neurotransmitter, transporters recycle these neurotransmitters (that is, bring them back into the neuron that released them), thereby shutting off the signal between neurons.

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugs-brains-behavior-science-addiction/drugs-brain

Neuroscience: What is ‘addiction’?

Any activity, substance, object, or behavior that has become the major focus of a person’s life to the exclusion of other activities, or that has begun to harm the individual or others physically, mentally, or socially is considered an addictive behavior. A person can become addicted, dependent, or compulsively obsessed with anything.

For addition to occur, the brain must go through a series of changes, beginning with recognition of pleasure and ending with a drive toward compulsive behaviour.  This is the rewiring that takes place in the brain.

Drugs are chemicals that affect the brain by tapping into its communication system and interfering with the way neurons normally send, receive, and process information. Some drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, can activate neurons because their chemical structure mimics that of a natural neurotransmitter. This similarity in structure “fools” receptors and allows the drugs to attach onto and activate the neurons. Although these drugs mimic the brain’s own chemicals, they don’t activate neurons in the same way as a natural neurotransmitter, and they lead to abnormal messages being transmitted through the network.

Other drugs, such as amphetamine or cocaine, (or Internet Addiction / Pornography) can cause the neurons to release abnormally large amounts of natural neurotransmitters or prevent the normal recycling of these brain chemicals. This disruption produces a greatly amplified message, ultimately disrupting communication channels.

Growing evidence indicates that behavioral addictions resemble substance addictions in many domains, including the dopamine mesolimbic systems. http://www.indiana.edu/~engs/hints/addictiveb.html

How do drugs work in the brain to produce pleasure?

Most drugs of abuse directly or indirectly target the brain’s reward system by flooding the circuit with dopamine. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter present in regions of the brain that regulate movement, emotion, motivation, and feelings of pleasure. When activated at normal levels, this system rewards our natural behaviors. Overstimulating the system with drugs, however, produces euphoric effects, which strongly reinforce the behavior of drug use—teaching the user to repeat it.

 

How does stimulation of the brain’s pleasure circuit teach us to keep taking drugs?

Our brains are wired to ensure that we will repeat life-sustaining activities by associating those activities with pleasure or reward. Whenever this reward circuit is activated, the brain notes that something important is happening that needs to be remembered, and teaches us to do it again and again without thinking about it. Because drugs of abuse stimulate the same circuit, we learn to abuse drugs in the same way.

brain-reward-system-1_custom-7956a51d432caa0dbca938fc8069ceccd6e88fd6-s900-c85

Why are drugs more addictive than natural rewards?

When some drugs of abuse are taken, they can release 2 to 10 times the amount of dopamine that natural rewards such as eating and sex do. In some cases, this occurs almost immediately (as when drugs are smoked or injected), and the effects can last much longer than those produced by natural rewards. The resulting effects on the brain’s pleasure circuit dwarf those produced by naturally rewarding behaviors. The effect of such a powerful reward strongly motivates people to take drugs again and again. This is why scientists sometimes say that drug abuse is something we learn to do very, very well.

Long-term drug abuse impairs brain functioning.

What happens to your brain if you keep taking drugs?

For the brain, the difference between normal rewards and drug rewards can be described as the difference between someone whispering into your ear and someone shouting into a microphone. Just as we turn down the volume on a radio that is too loud, the brain adjusts to the overwhelming surges in dopamine (and other neurotransmitters) by producing less dopamine or by reducing the number of receptors that can receive signals. As a result, dopamine’s impact on the reward circuit of the brain of someone who abuses drugs can become abnormally low, and that person’s ability to experience any pleasure is reduced.

anhedonia303

This is why a person who abuses drugs eventually feels flat, lifeless, and depressed, and is unable to enjoy things that were previously pleasurable. Now, the person needs to keep taking drugs again and again just to try and bring his or her dopamine function back up to normal—which only makes the problem worse, like a vicious cycle. Also, the person will often need to take larger amounts of the drug to produce the familiar dopamine high—an effect known as tolerance.

Get help

Do a self-test Quiz

Alcohol Abuse Quiz

Substance Abuse Quiz

Pornography Quiz

Internet & Gaming addiction Quiz

Love addiction Quiz

Free counselling:

You can get help by text-chatting to a facilitator on our LIVE CHAT. The  service is free and you may stay anonymous. The service is online every Sunday: 18h00-20h00;  Monday – Thursday from 19h00-21h00.

Recovery from Addiction.

Listed here are our suggestions for a journey to break free from addiction. Recovery from Addiction.

Counselling

You can book counselling sessions for Porn & Sex Addiction, Substance Addiction, Alcohol Addiction & Gambling Addiction with the following therapists:

 

Therapists