LSD

LSD  – Lysergic acid diethylamide

LSD

LSD  is one of the strongest hallucinogenic drugs. It can disrupt the normal functioning of your brain, possibly for the short term, or possibly for life.

Hallucinogens are drugs that cause hallucinations. Users see images, hear sounds and feel sensations that seem very real but do not exist. Some hallucinogens also produce sudden and unpredictable changes in the mood of those who use them.

LSD is a potent hallucinogen that dramatically alters your thoughts and your perception of reality. It was discovered in 1938 in a fungus that grows on rye and other grains. LSD has a high potential for abuse.

What does LSD look like?

Known as “acid” and by many other names, LSD is sold on the street in small tablets (“microdots”), capsules or gelatine squares (“window panes”).

It is sometimes added to absorbent paper, which is then divided into small squares decorated with designs or cartoon characters (“loony toons”).

Occasionally it is sold in liquid form. But no matter what form it comes in, LSD leads the user to the same place—a serious disconnection from reality.

LSD users call an LSD experience a “trip,” typically lasting twelve hours or so. When things go wrong, which often happens, it is called a “bad trip,” another name for a living hell.

 

Effects of LSD

The effects of LSD are unpredictable. They depend on the amount taken, the person’s mood and personality, and the surroundings in which the drug is used. It is a roll of the dice—a racing, distorted high or a severe, paranoid low.

Normally, the first effects of LSD are experienced thirty to ninety minutes after taking the drug. Often, the pupils become dilated. The body temperature can become higher or lower, while the blood pressure and heart rate either increase or decrease. Sweating or chills are not uncommon.

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LSD users often experience loss of appetite, sleeplessness, dry mouth and tremors. Visual changes are among the more common effects—the user can become fixated on the intensity of certain colors.

Extreme changes in mood, anywhere from a spaced-out “bliss” to intense terror, are also experienced. The worst part is that the LSD user is unable to tell which sensations are created by the drug and which are part of reality.

Some LSD users experience an intense bliss they mistake for “enlightenment.”

Not only do they disassociate from their usual activities in life, but they also feel the urge to keep taking more of the drug in order to re-experience the same sensation. Others experience severe, terrifying thoughts and feelings, fear of losing control, fear of insanity and death, and despair while using LSD. Once it starts, there is often no stopping a “bad trip,” which can go on for up to twelve hours. In fact, some people never recover from an acid-induced psychosis.

Taken in a large enough dosage, LSD produces delusions and visual hallucinations. The user’s sense of time and self image will change. Sizes and shapes of objects become distorted, as do movements, colors and sounds. Even one’s sense of touch and the normal bodily sensations turn into something strange and bizarre. Sensations may seem to “cross over,” giving the user the feeling of hearing colors and seeing sounds. These changes can be frightening and can cause panic.

The ability to make sensible judgments and see common dangers is impaired. An LSD user might try to step out a window to get a “closer look” at the ground. He might consider it fun to admire the sunset, blissfully unaware that he is standing in the middle of a busy intersection.

Many LSD users experience flashbacks, or a recurrence of the LSD trip, often without warning, long after taking LSD. It is a psychological phenomenon in which an individual has a sudden, usually powerful, re-experiencing of a past experience or elements of a past experience. These experiences can be happy, sad, exciting, or any other emotion one can consider. A flashback is when memories of a past trauma feel as if they are taking place in the current moment. That means it’s possible to feel like the experience the person had while using LSD,  is happening all over again. During a flashback it can be difficult to connect with reality.

Bad trips and flashbacks are only part of the risks of LSD use. LSD users may manifest relatively long-lasting psychoses or severe depression.

Because LSD accumulates in the body, users develop a tolerance for the drug. In other words, some repeat users have to take it in increasingly higher doses to achieve a “high.” This increases the physical effects and also the risk of a bad trip that could cause psychosis.

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Get the facts

Drug dealers, motivated by the profits they make, will say anything to get you to buy their drugs. They will tell you that taking LSD will “expand your mind.”

They don’t care if the drugs ruin your life as long as they are getting paid. All they care about is money. Former dealers have admitted they saw their buyers as “pawns in a chess game.”

The following is an example of how the online texting writing skills of a person change before using a drug and during the trip:

Before: ”So hul gaan my nie seer maak of iets nie? En wat doen hulle as jy nie saam werk nie? Of moeilik raak ? En soek hul jou deur voor jy in gaan? En wat gebeur as hul aan jou kry? Vat hul dit net?”

During:  ”Ekt weer gebruik Lsd. Nou net. En ek Myself wer gesny. DI self de di Drugs be gin wErk . K weti di nk k gan sl aap ni. K vrT rou ju ma ar is we ll no g banG.So rrY dt onz no it di k ans geKR y. hE t om oP dI KA mp te Ch at nI so rry dt Dt so mUt GE beUr…”

Quiz:

You can do a self-test on drug addiction, the Substance Abuse Quiz.

MOBIEG Helpline

If you have more questions about LSD, you may chat to an online facilitator on the LIVE CHAT.

It is a free service and you may stay anonymous.

We are online for counseling Sundays: 18h00-20h30

Mondays – Thursdays: 19h00-21h30