Prescription drugs: Ritalin / Concerta

Prescription drugs: Ritalin / Concerta

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Recreational use of prescription drugs is a serious problem with teens and young adults. National studies show that a teen is more likely to have abused a prescription drug than an illegal street drug.

Many teens think prescription drugs are safe because they were prescribed by a doctor. But taking them for nonmedical use to get high or “self-medicate” can be just as dangerous and addictive as taking illegal street drugs.

A prescription drug (also prescription medication or prescription medicine) is a pharmaceutical drug that legally requires a medical prescription to be dispensed. In contrast, over-the-counter drugs can be obtained without a prescription. The reason many drugs have to be prescribed by a doctor is because some of them are quite addictive.

Prescription drug abuse is when someone takes a medication that was prescribed for someone else or takes their own prescription in a way not intended by a doctor or for a different reason—like to get high.

Many people don’t realize that distributing or selling prescription drugs (other than by a doctor) is a form of drug dealing and as illegal as selling heroin or cocaine, with costly fines and jail time. When the drug dealing results in death or serious bodily injury, dealers can face life imprisonment.

Ritalin and Concerta are stimulants for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Concerta

Stimulants, sometimes called “uppers,” temporarily increase alertness and energy. The most commonly used street drugs that fall into this category are cocaine and amphetamines.
Prescription stimulants come in tablets or capsules. When abused, they are swallowed, injected in liquid form or crushed and snorted.

SHORT-TERM EFFECTS
The short-term effects of stimulants include exhaustion, apathy and depression—the “down” that follows the “up.” It is this immediate and lasting exhaustion that quickly leads the stimulant user to want the drug again. Soon he is not trying to get “high,” he is only trying to get “well”—to feel any energy at all.
LONG-TERM EFFECTS
Stimulants can be addictive. Repeated high doses of some stimulants over a short period can lead to feelings of hostility or paranoia. Such doses may also result in dangerously high body temperatures and an irregular heartbeat.

Photos shows three prescription medication bottles with the pills spilling out. You can not identify the patient information on the labels but enough of the label is visible to show it is a real prescription.

Ritalin is an amphetamine (in street jargon, “speed”) with a lengthy list of side effects, including nervousness, insomnia, nausea, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, dizziness, palpitations, headaches, irregular heart rhythms, psychic dependence and in short, addiction.
In clinical studies, side effects of Concerta were virtually identical to those of Ritalin.
There are natural alternatives to both Ritalin and Concerta, but you’re not likely to hear about them from most conventional doctors.

ADHD drugs are either the “amphetamine-like” methylphenidate (e.g., Ritalin and Concerta) or actual amphetamines (e.g., Adderall and Vyvanse), so it should not be surprising that long-term use is associated with many hazards.
Methylphenidate has a chemical structure similar to that of cocaine and acts on the brain in a very similar way.

 

Do a self-test quiz if you think you might have a dependency problem with prescription medication – the Substance Abuse Quiz. You may chat to an online facilitator if you have more questions on this subject – LIVE CHAT